Interviews

Napkin Poetry Review – “A Magic Made Modern

When encountering Andreea Iulia Scridon’s work, readers time travel between myth and modernity, across worlds of romance and scholarship: from Oxford to Florida, from London to Paris and beyond. A friend of the Napkin and author of three collections, Scridon shares how she balances craft, inspiration, and overall wellbeing: how can we sustain ourselves as body-locked humans and creatives all at once? In prose as ethereal yet grounded as her poetry, she tells us, ‘If the world around is a clump of flour — bouncy, moist, tender — then to create a poem is to put that flour in the oven and taken out as a fragrant, gilded loaf of bread.’”

Fevers of the Mind – “Quick-9 Interview with Andreea-Iulia Scridon

“My growing up between Romania, France, and the US absolutely influenced my writing. From an early age, this continuous change of scenery instilled a sense of atmosphere in me, which I think is essential to my poetry. And a certain flexibility, I like to think. There’s an entire epic autobiography in that. I then spent my school years in Florida and my summers in Romania, which is how A Romanian Poem was born – of that experience, of everything it meant and how I “sensed” it. It always felt like an immersive return to the past, as opposed to America, which I would say enlarged my sense of possibility and therefore made me quite enthusiastic…But Romanian aesthetics and tropes are undoubtedly an important part of my work. And I was very lucky in that my grandmother took me around Europe during these vacations, which enlarged my interests, tastes, and knowledge.”

Orizonturi Culturale Italo-Române – “Andreea Iulia Scridon: „Viața literară din România este foarte vie””

I admire fiction and poetry that reproduce the spirit of certain eras, human types, complex and difficult psychological processes […] For a writer, dealing with the most abstract of arts, the question ‘what inspires you’ is about as intimidating as ‘why do you love me’. But, in short, I always started with color – my childhood was a procession of long afternoons in which I played alone and I perfectly remember the fascination that filled me when I saw the sunset on the balcony, window, wall. And now, when I see a more special shade, I wonder where that color comes from and where it goes. And I must find out.”


			
			
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